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Mexico just keeping pace with demand for coconuts

Coconut supply looks steady as Mexico is just over a month away from winding down its winter season.

“We have our own 1,000 acres of coconuts in Mexico and in the winter, we have a high production,” says Mayra Romero with Fresco Produce LLC based in McAllen, Tex. “We have enough supplies from October to March, so for our high production season. And then after Easter, demand is higher in the summer but we have lower production.”

That puts extra pressure on a commodity that’s already seeing a heavy jump in sales over the last five years. “Six years ago, it was a challenge for us to sell coconuts. We’ve seen an increasing interest in coconuts in that time, even in the winter,” says Romero. “But now while we have enough coconuts, we don’t have an excess.” 



More coconut companies
Romero sees more and more companies trying to bring coconuts into the US market. “With this new generation getting to know the coconuts better, more companies are approaching the US market. But even with more packers, we don’t have an excess of coconuts because of the increasing consumption. We sell five to 10 times more coconuts than 10 years ago,” she says. 

Additionally, other coconut product companies--such as coconut water, oil, milk, meat and others, are also adding to pricing pressure. 

That said, the price has increased only incrementally. “We have a set price in the winter and in the summer. The price of coconuts is more stable than other commodities,” says Romero. “But from last year, we only increased in price a dollar or two.”

Cold weather effect
Looking ahead, by the end of February, winter production of coconuts will slow down significantly. And Romero believes that recent weather events—including the cold snaps seen over the continent---it’s potentially affecting future crops. “We’re forecasting that the weather may affect the number of coconuts received per country—but now they might also get as small a coconut, what you see in March, in the summer. It’ll grow slower because of the cold weather,” Romero says.
 
For more information:
Mayra Romero
Fresco Produce LLC
Tel: (+1) 956-720-0917
mayra@fresco-produce.com
www.frescar.com

Publication date: 1/29/2018
Author: Astrid van den Broek
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


 


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