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More than 40 tons of avocado were stolen in two thefts in Michoacan

Mexico's Attorney General's Office (FGR) has started to investigate the theft of 40,000 kilos of avocado in Michoacan, a leading producer of this fruit in Mexico. The product was robbed in separate events and these thefts have the authorities and the avocado industry in the region on alert.

The first theft was reported on the Villa Madero highway, near Tiripetio, Morelia, where armed individuals intercepted a federal motor vehicle, from which they stole more than 20,000 kilograms of avocado. A second similar theft took place on the P√°tzcuaro-Cuitzeo highway, in the community of Cuto del Porvenir, Tarimbaro, where another vehicle was stopped by armed individuals who stole a similar amount of avocado.

The identity of the affected companies or whether the thefts affected one or more companies has not yet been revealed. The FGR, through a statement, assured that it continues with the investigations to gather the necessary proof to proceed against the criminals.

Farmers in Michoacan have reported being victims of threats and extortion by organized crime groups. The main victims are lemon, berry, and avocado producers. The criminals demand they pay 2 to 3 pesos per kilo marketed.

The modus operandi reported by the victims coincides with tactics previously reported by carriers of different types of goods. In response to the growing insecurity, police officers started to accompany trucks loaded with avocados on routes to Uruapan in Santa Ana Zirosto, Michoacan, to safeguard this valuable cargo.

Source: infobae.com

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