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AU: Cherries to Taiwan again

Cherry growers from Central Western New South Wales are optimistic that they can re-enter the Taiwanese market, following on from the success of a trial shipment late last year, according to NSW Deputy Premier and Minister for Trade and Investment Andrew Stoner said.

Mr Stoner and Member for Orange Andrew Gee today visited the orchard and packhouse at Caernarvon Cherries, which provided the storage facilities for the cold dis-infestation for the cherry shipment. In January 2006 Taiwan banned any Australian fruit with the potential to host Queensland fruit fly, effectively closing an important NSW fruit export market.

"This is great news for this partnership of cherry producers around Orange, who have had to meet very rigorous bio-security protocols negotiated between Taiwanese and Australian authorities," Mr Stoner said.

"The main feature of the new bio-security requirements is that the designated shipment of cherries must be put into cold dis-infestation for 18 days during which the cool room can’t be opened to store more cherries for a different shipment.

"NSW Trade & Investment’s Orange-based export adviser has worked with Great Southern Fresh Produce, an alliance of 22 Central Western cherry growers, providing advice and assistance on this export to Taiwan, help with AQIS accreditation, and other export and market advice."

Mr Gee said that the cherry industry was valuable to the Central West economy and that he was delighted that the products were being taken to the world.

"We love our local cherries here in the Central West and I am sure our friends in Taiwan miss them and will welcome our wonderful products back.

"I congratulate NSW Trade & Investment and all of our local cherry producers on achieving this important boost to the local industry Gee said."

Director of Great Southern Fresh Produce Andrew Gartrell said the initial shipment, which comprised 250 five-kilogram cartons, was well received in Taiwan.

"We’ve had very positive feedback from the Taiwanese wholesalers and retailers which gives me confidence that we can export more cherries to Taiwan – hopefully we will ship 50 to 100 tonnes by the end of this year," Mr Gartrell said.

he said success in Taiwan in the past mean that it was clear there was potential for the produce there.

Source: www.investinaustralia.com

Publication date: 3/26/2012


 


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