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Italy: Bad weather affects cabbage market

There are not a lot of cabbages available at the moment (Savoy, white or red). Prices are on the up, but they start low. This is due to the spring-like temperatures in January followed by the snow and frost in late February.

"There is not a lot of produce available, we have had to source it from Spain and Portugal. In January, however, there was a lot of domestic produce on the market, not only from Puglia but from Veneto as well. Prices remain low at 50-70 eurocents," explains Mirko Daniele, wholesaler at Mercato di Padova.

A producer from the north confirms that there was a lot of produce available this year, meaning quotations remained low. Quality was good but there were plenty of heads weighing from 1.5 kg upwards with tender leaves.

Emile Fellini from Fellini Patrizio reports that "there is little produce available ad prices are increasing. Until a few weeks ago, sales were slow due to the spring-like temperatures but then the bad weather affected production. Anyway, volumes are low all over Europe from what we can see."

In Pescara, Lello De Felice refers that "Savoy cabbage is actually more popular and is also commercialised in northern Italy. Prices currently hover around 70 eurocents. They have been increasing lately due to the weather conditions."

Roman cauliflower after the frost, F.lli Calevi (Viterbo).

Stefano Calevi from F.lli Calevi in Viterbo (Lazio) also reports that frost has damaged the produce. "Roman cauliflowers were damaged as well as cauliflowers and broccoli and are now impossible to harvest. There will definitely be a lot less produce available over the next 20-30 days. Plants that hadn't set yet are safe, but we still need to find a way not to interrupt supplies to retailers. We're hoping the situation will improve in 20-25 days' time."

Roman cauliflower after the frost, F.lli Calevi (Viterbo).

As regards the Spanish produce that might fill the gap, Calevi says that "it can already be found on the market, as the country hasn't been affected by such low temperatures."

Authors: Cristiano Riciputi and Maria Luigia Brusco
Copyright: www.freshplaza.it

Publication date: 3/8/2018


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