Albert Heijn opts for bio-degradable packaging

For the last three years, Albert Heijn has been one of the very few supermarkets in the Netherlands to use bio-degradable packaging for a number of its fresh organic fruit and vegetable products.

On Tuesday, September 5, at the start of the new academic year at Wageningen University and Research Center, Dick Boer, General Manager of Albert Heijn, announced that Albert Heijn would begin offering all fresh organic fruit and vegetables in bio-degradable packaging.

The new academic year at Wageningen University opened with the theme of 'the bio-based economy'. In his speech, Dick Boer dwelt upon the initiatives that Albert Heijn has undertaken in the field of the bio-based economy, and emphasised the importance of coordinating technological developments with the wishes of consumers.

Boer also announced a new step that Albert Heijn will make in sustainable development. 'Our customers ask for healthiness and sustainability. We gladly set the trend here as well. Starting this month, the standard packaging of all Albert Heijn's fresh organic fruit and vegetables will be bio-degradable,' he said.

For the last three years, Albert Heijn has been one of the very few supermarkets in the Netherlands to use bio-degradable packaging for a number of its fresh organic fruit and vegetable products. Starting this month, the packaging of all 22 fresh organic fruit and vegetables will be changed to bio-degradable wrapping. This packaging is based on biological raw materials instead of crude oil.

The environmentally friendly packing material can be recognised by its logo featuring a seedling. This logo is only allowed on material that conforms with the strict European guidelines on degradable packaging materials. This packaging can therefore be disposed of in the green (vegetable, fruit and garden waste) recycling bin.